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Drug overview

Last updated: September 17, 2021

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This article gives an overview of the most important classes of drugs used for each system (e.g., the cardiovascular system), as well as the most common drugs that are used in the treatment of specific conditions (e.g., Parkinson disease).

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Nonopioid analgesics
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Ibuprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, naproxen [1]
  • Acute and chronic pain
Aspirin [2]
COX-2 inhibitors (selective NSAIDs, e.g., celecoxib) [3]
  • Reversible selective inhibition of COX-2 with almost no inhibition of COX-1analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects
Acetaminophen
  • Severe liver impairment
Metamizole
  • Not available in the US (withdrawn)
  • MTX: ↑ risk of hematologic toxicity
Opioid analgesics
Low-potency opioids (e.g., codeine, tramadol)
  • Respiratory depression
  • CNS depression
  • Euphoria
  • Strong addictive potential
Medium-potency opioids (e.g., morphine, oxycodone, methadone)
High-potency opioids (e.g., fentanyl, buprenorphine)

This section provides an overview of the most important antimicrobial drug classes and substances.

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Inhibition of cell wall synthesis

β-lactams

Penicillins Natural penicillins (e.g., penicillin G and penicillin V)
Antistaphylococcal penicillins (e.g., oxacillin)
Aminopenicillins (e.g., amoxicillin, ampicillin)
Antipseudomonal penicillins (e.g., piperacillin, ticarcillin)
Cephalosporins First-generation (e.g., cephalexin)
Second-generation (e.g., cefaclor)
Third-generation (e.g., cefixime)
Fourth-generation (e.g., cefepime)
Fifth-generation (ceftaroline)
Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem, meropenem)
Monobactams (e.g., aztreonam)
  • Gastrointestinal upset

Glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin)

Epoxides (e.g., fosfomycin)

Disruption of cell membrane integrity
Lipopeptides (e.g., daptomycin)
Polymyxins (e.g., colistin, polymyxin B)
Inhibition of protein synthesis: 30S ribosomal subunit
Aminoglycosides (e.g., gentamicin, streptomycin, neomycin)
Tetracyclines (e.g., tetracycline, doxycycline)
Glycylcylines (tetracyclin derivative; e.g., tigecycline)
Inhibition of protein synthesis: 50S ribosomal subunit
Macrolides and ketolides (e.g., erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin)
Lincosamides (e.g., clindamycin)

Streptogramins (quinupristin-dalfopristin)

Oxazolidinones (linezolid)
Amphenicols (chloramphenicol)
DNA gyrase inhibition
Fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin)
Disruption of DNA integrity
Nitroimidazoles (e.g., metronidazole)
Inhibition of folic acid synthesis and reduction
Sulfonamides and diaminopyrimidines (e.g., trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole)
Antimycobacterial drugs
Rifamycins (e.g., rifampin)
Hydrazides (isoniazid)

Nicotinamides (pyrazinamide)

Ethylenediamine derivates (ethambutol)
Sulfones (dapsone)
Others
Nitrofurans (nitrofurantoin)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Polyenes (e.g., amphotericin B, nyastin)
Azoles Triazoles (e.g., fluconazole, itraconazole)
Imidazoles (e.g., ketoconazole, clotrimazole)
Echinocandins (e.g., caspofungin)
Pyridone derivatives (ciclopirox)
Benzofurans (griseofulvin)
Antimetabolites (flucytosine)
Overview
Drug Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects

Bendazoles (e.g., albendazole, mebendazole)

Pyrantel pamoate
Praziquantel
Ivermectin
Diethylcarbamazine
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Pentamidine
Suramin
Eflornithine
Nifurtimox
Melarsoprol
Sodium stibogluconate
Paromomycin
Miltefosine
Diloxanide
Iodoquinol

Hepatitis viruses

Herpes viruses

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects

Nucleoside analogs

Acyclovir, valacyclovir

Ganciclovir, valganciclovir

Cidofovir
Pyrophosphate analogs (e.g., foscarnet)

Antisense oligonucleotides (e.g., fomivirsen)

Influenza viruses

Overview

Agents

Indications

Mechanism of action

Adverse effects

NMDA receptor antagonists (e.g., amantadine, rimantadine)

Neuraminidase inhibitors (e.g., oseltamivir, zanamivir)

RNA polymerase endonuclease inhibitor (baloxavir marboxil)
Overview
Drug Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Permethrin
Dimeticone
Malathion

This section provides an overview of the most important drug classes and substances targeting the cardiovascular system.

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Sodium channel blockers (class I) Class IA (e.g., quinidine, procainamide)
Class IB (e.g., lidocaine, phenytoin)
Class IC (e.g., propafenon)
Beta blockers (class II; e.g., metoprolol, propranolol)
Potassium channel blockers (class III; e.g., amiodarone) [8]
Calcium channel blockers (class IV; diltiazem, verapamil)
Ivabradine
  • Simultaneous treatment with CYP3A4 inhibitors/inducers should be avoided.
Adenosine
Magnesium sulfate [9]
Digoxin
  • Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPases↑ contractility, heart rate
  • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
  • Visual disturbances (blurry vision with a yellow tint and halos)
  • Intoxication: severe arrhythmias
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
First-line antihypertensives
Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (e.g., lisinopril, captopril, enalapril)
Angiotensin-receptor blockers (sartans; e.g., valsartan, candesartan)
Thiazide diuretics
Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) Dihydropyridines (e.g., nifedipine, amlodipine) [10]
Nondihydropyridines Benzothiazepines (diltiazem)
Phenylalkylamines (verapamil)
Second-line antihypertensives
Beta blockers (e.g., propranolol, metoprolol, labetalol)
Loop diuretics (e.g., furosemide, torsemide)
Aldosterone antagonists (e.g., eplerenone, spironolactone)
Direct renin inhibitors (e.g., aliskiren)
  • Direct inhibition of renin
Direct arteriolar vasodilators Hydralazine [11]
Sodium nitroprusside [12]
Alpha-1 blockers (e.g., doxazosin, prazosin) [13]
  • Hypersensitivity
Alpha-2 agonists (e.g., clonidine)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Statins (e.g., atorvastatin, simvastatin)

Bile acid sequestrants (e.g., cholestyramine, colestipol)

Ezetimibe

Fibrates (e.g., bezafibrate, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil)
Niacin

PCSK9 inhibitors (e.g., alirocumab, evolocumab)

Marine omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil)

Lomitapide

This section provides an overview of the most important drug classes and substances that act on the central and peripheral nervous system.

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Intravenous anesthetics
Propofol

Etomidate

Ketamine

Barbiturates
Benzodiazepines

Opioids

Inhalational anesthetics
Nitrous oxide
Desflurane
Sevoflurane
Isoflurane
Enflurane
Halothane
Methoxyflurane
Local anesthetics
Amide group anesthetics Short-acting (e.g., procaine)
Long-acting (e.g., tetracaine)
Ester group anesthetics Intermediate-acting (e.g., lidocaine)
Long-acting (e.g., bupivacaine)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
First-generation (classic) anticonvulsants Valproate
Carbamazepine
Ethosuximide
Phenytoin/fosphenytoin
Phenobarbital
Benzodiazepines
Second-generation (newer) anticonvulsants Lamotrigine [16]
Tiagabine [17]
Levetiracetam [18]
Pregabalin

Gabapentin

Vigabatrin [19]
Topiramate [20]
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
St. John's Wort
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram)
Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; e.g., venlafaxine, duloxetine)
Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) Secondary amines (e.g., nortriptyline, desipramine)
Tertiary amines (e.g., amitriptyline, imipramine)
Serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs; e.g., trazodone)
Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs; e.g., tranylcypromine, phenelzine, selegiline)
Atypical antidepressants Mirtazapine
Bupropion [21]
Vilazodone
Vortioxetine
Varenicline
Buspirone
Mood stabilizers
Lithium
  • Inhibition of the phosphoinositol cascade
Anticonvulsants (e.g., sodium valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Drugs that decrease the synthesis of aqueous humor

Beta blockers (e.g., timolol, betaxolol, carteolol)

Alpha-1 agonists (e.g., epinephrine)

Alpha-2 agonists (e.g., apraclonidine, brimonidine)

Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (e.g., acetazolamide)

Drugs that improve the outflow of aqueous humor

PGF2α (e.g., latanoprost, bimatoprost)

Parasympathomimetics Direct parasympathomimetics (e.g., pilocarpine, carbachol)
Indirect parasympathomimetics (e.g., physostigmine, echothiophate)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Benzodiazepines Short-acting (e.g., midazolam, triazolam, alprazolam, oxazepam)
Intermediate-acting (e.g., temazepam, lorazepam)
Long-acting (e.g., diazepam, clonazepam)
Benzodiazepine-like substances (Z-drugs; e.g., zolpidem, zaleplon, eszopiclone)
Barbiturates Ultra short duration of action (e.g., thiopental)
Short duration of action (e.g., pentobarbital)
Intermediate duration of action (e.g., amobarbital)
Long duration of action Phenobarbital
Primidone
Melatonin agonists (e.g., ramelteon)
Orexin antagonists (e.g., suvorexant)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Antimetabolites
Antifolates (e.g., methotrexate, pemetrexed)
Pyrimidine antagonists (e.g., 5-FU, cytarabine, gemcitabine)
Purine antagonists (e.g., 6-MP, azathioprine, fludarabine)
Ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors (e.g., hydroxyurea)
Alkylating agents
Oxazaphosphorines (e.g., cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide)
Nitrogen mustards (e.g., chlorambucil, melphalan)
Imidazotetrazines (e.g., temozolomide)
Nitrosoureas (e.g., carmustine, lomustine)

Alkyl sulfonates (e.g., busulfan)

Hydrazines (e.g., procarbazin)
Platinum-based agents (e.g., cisplatin, oxaliplatin)
Topoisomerase inhibitors
Topoisomerase I inhibitors (e.g., irinotecan, topotecan)
Topoisomerase II inhibitors (e.g., etoposide)
Mitotic inhibitors
Vinca alkaloids (e.g., vincristine, vinblastine)
Taxanes (e.g., paclitaxel)
Nontaxane microtubule inhibitors (e.g., eribulin, ixabepilone)
Cytotoxic antibiotics
Bleomycin
Actinomycin D (dactinomycin)
Anthracyclines (e.g., doxorubicin)
Mitomycin
Protein kinase inhibitors
BCR-ABL and c-KIT tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib)
EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib, gefitinib)
ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., alectinib)
V600E mutated-BRAF oncogene inhibitors (e.g., dabrafenib, vemurafenib)

MEK inhibitors (e.g., trametinib)

Bruton kinase inhibitors (e.g., ibrutinib)

Janus kinase inhibitors (ruxolitinib)

CDK inhibitors (e.g., palbociclib)

Other groups
Enzymes (e.g., L-asparaginase)

Proteasome inhibitors (e.g., carfilzomib, bortezomib)

PARP inhibitors (e.g., olaparib)

Monoclonal antibodies
Detoxifying agents
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Preventable adverse effect
Leucovorin
Mesna
Amifostine
Dexrazoxane
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Hormonal contraception
Oral contraceptive pill Progestin-only contraceptive pills (POPs; minipill)

Combined oral contraceptive (COC)

Contraceptive patch
  • Similar to COC

Vaginal ring

Injectable progestin

Progestin intrauterine device
Subdermal progestin implant
Nonhormonal contraception
Nonhormonal intrauterine device
  • Altered tubal motility → spermicidal effect and prevention of implantation
Behavioral methods Coitus interruptus
  • High risk for human error

Fertility awareness-based methods

Lactational amenorrhea

Vaginal douche

  • The vagina is flushed with water or other products immediately after male ejaculation during intercourse in an attempt to flush out semen
  • Likely highly unreliable
Barrier methods Spermicides
  • Foams or jellies that are inserted into the vagina prior to sexual intercourse → spermicidal effects
  • Vaginal irritation

Diaphragm

  • Dome-shaped latex, metal, or plastic device that holds spermicide is placed into the anterior and posterior fornix of the vagina prior to sexual intercourse → prevention of semen passing into the cervix
Cervical cap
  • Cup-shaped latex, metal, or plastic device that holds spermicide is placed over the base of the cervix → prevention of semen passing into the cervical canal

Sponge

  • Foam disk containing spermicidal fluid is inserted → prevention of semen entering the cervix; spermicidal effects
  • Vaginal irritation

Condom

  • A thin sheath that is placed over the shaft of the penis or in the vaginal canal prior to sexual intercourse → physical barrier between penile, vaginal, and/or anal secretions
  • Unintended pregnancy or infection due to breakage
  • High risk of poor compliance
Surgical sterilization Vasectomy
Female sterilization
Emergency contraception
Hormonal methods

Levonorgestrel

Antiprogestins (e.g., ulipristal acetate)
Ethinyl estradiol PLUS levonorgestrel (Yuzpe regimen)
Nonhormonal methods (copper-containing intrauterine devices)
  • See above.

This section provides an overview of the most important drug classes and substances targeting the endocrine system.

Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Sevelamer
Cinacalcet
Cation-exchange medications Resins (e.g., sodium polystyrene sulfonate)
  • Nonurgent lowering of K+
  • Release Na+ or Ca2+ ions in the gut, which are exchanged for K+↑ enteral K+ elimination
Polymers (e.g., patiromer)
Fludrocortisone
  • Binds to mineralocorticoid receptors → ↓ sodium excretion, ↑ potassium excretion
Demeclocycline
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Antithyroid drugs
Thionamides (e.g., carbimazole, propylthiouracil)
Potassium iodides (e.g., Lugol iodine)
  • No severe interactions
Hormone replacement drugs
Synthetic T4 (e.g., levothyroxine)
  • Estrogen: Increased dosage of synthetic T4 is necessary.
  • Glucocorticoids: Decreased dosage of synthetic T4 is necessary.
Synthetic T3 (e.g., liothyronine)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Gastric acid suppression medications and antacids
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs; e.g., omeprazole, pantoprazole)
H2 antihistamines (e.g., ranitidine, cimetidine)
Antacids Calcium carbonate
Magnesium hydroxide
Aluminum hydroxide
Antiemetics
Dopamine receptor antagonists (e.g., metoclopramide, prochlorperazine, domperidone)
Serotonin receptor antagonists (e.g, ondansetron, granisetron)
Neurokinin receptor antagonists (e.g., aprepitant)
Anticholinergic agents (e.g., scopolamine)
Antihistamines (e.g., dimenhydrinate)
Laxatives
Osmotic laxatives (e.g., polyethylene glycol, glycerin, lactulose)
Stimulant laxatives/secretory laxatives (e.g., senna, bisacodyl)
Emollient stool softener (e.g., docusate)
Bulk-forming laxatives (e.g., methylcellulose, psyllium husks, polycarbophil)
Miscellaneous
Octreotide
Loperamide
Misoprostol
Orlistat
  • Weight loss in patients with obesity
  • Reversible inhibition of gastric and pancreatic lipase↓ breakdown and absorption of fat
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions

Acute gout flare

Glucocorticoids (e.g., prednisone)

NSAIDs (e.g., naproxen)
Colchicine
  • Increases statin concentrations
Chronic gout
Xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOIs) Allopurinol
  • Competitive inhibition
Febuxostat
  • Selective inhibition
  • History of cardiovascular disease
Uricosurics (e.g., probenecid)
  • Alternative to or used in combination with an XOI
  • Penicillin: inhibits secretion↑ serum concentration
Recombinant uricase (pegloticase)
  • Failure of first- and second-line medications
  • Catalyzes the breakdown of uric acid to allantoin
Antiplatelet agents
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Irreversible cyclooxgenase inhibitors (aspirin)
  • Allergy
  • Active/recent bleeding
  • Major surgery/severe trauma
  • Aspirin: febrile illness in individuals < 19 years of age, acute gout attack
Warfarin, NSAIDs: ↑ risk of bleeding [28][29]
P2Y12 receptor antagonists (e.g., clopidogrel, ticagrelor, ticlopidine)
Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab, eptifibatide, tirofiban) GpIIb/IIIa inhibitors bind to and block gpIIb/IIIa receptors on the surface of activated platelets → inhibition of platelet aggregation and thrombus formation
Oral anticoagulants
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Vitamin K antagonists (coumarins, e.g., phenprocoumon, warfarin)
Direct oral thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran)
Direct oral factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., apixaban, rivaroxaban) [30]
  • Selective and direct inhibition of factor Xa
Parenteral anticoagulants
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Unfractionated heparin (UFH
  • Bleeding
  • Hypersensitivity to heparin or pork [31]
  • Drugs that influence hemostasis: ↑ risk of bleeding
Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH; e.g., enoxaparin, dalteparin)
  • Poor renal function (CrCl < 30 mL/min)
Synthetic heparin (fondaparinux) [32]
  • Poor renal function (CrCl < 30 mL/min)
  • Bacterial endocarditis
  • Hypersensitivity
Heparinoids (glycosaminoglycans, e.g., danaparoid)
  • Hypersensitivity to heparinoids or pork products [33]
Direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., argatroban, dabigatran)
  • Directly inhibit thrombin (freely circulating and in association with clots)
  • Hypersensitivity [34]
Fibrinolytics
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Fibrin-specific agents Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)
Recombinant plasminogen activators (rtPAs; e.g., alteplase, reteplase)
Nonfibrin-specific agents (e.g., streptokinase, urokinase)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects
Glucocorticoids (e.g., prednisolone, hydrocortisone, dexamethasone)
Calcineurin inhibitors Cyclosporine A
Tacrolimus
mTOR inhibitors (e.g., sirolimus, everolimus)
Purine analog (e.g., azathioprine)
IMDH/IMPDH inhibitors (e.g., mycophenolate mofetil)
Other cytostatic and antiproliferative agents (e.g., MTX, cyclophosphamide)
Protein drugs Antibodies (e.g., basiliximab)
Other biological proteins (e.g., etanercept)
Overview
Agents Indications Mechanism of action Adverse effects Contraindications Interactions
Pulmonary hypertension drugs

Endothelin receptor antagonists (e.g., bosentan, macitentan, ambrisentan) [36]

Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g., sildenafil)
Prostacyclin analogs (e.g., iloprost, treprostinil)
Long-acting synthetic prostacyclins (e.g., epoprostenol) [37]
Asthma drugs
Beta-2 agonists Short-acting beta-2 agonists (SABA; e.g., albuterol, terbutaline) [38]
Long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABA; e.g., salmeterol, formoterol) [39]
Muscarinic antagonists Short-acting muscarinic antagonists (SAMA; e.g, ipratropium bromide)
Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA; e.g., tiotropium bromide)
Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs; e.g., montelukast) [40]
Corticosteroids Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS; e.g., budesonide, fluticasone, mometasone)
Oral corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, methylprednisone)
Leukotriene pathway modifiers (e.g., zileuton) [41]
Mast cell stabilizers (chromones, e.g., cromolyn sodium) [42]
Methylxanthines (e.g., theophylline)
Biologics

Anti-IgE antibodies (omalizumab) [43]

IL-5 antibodies (e.g., mepolizumab, reslizumab) [44]
Miscellaneous respiratory drugs
H1 antihistamines First-generation antihistamines (e.g., diphenhydramine, dimenhydrinate)
  • Hypnotics, sedatives: CNS depression [45]
Second-generation antihistamines (e.g., loratadine, cetirizine)
  • No clinically relevant interactions [46]
Dextromethorphan (DXM)
Pseudoephedrine
  • Nasal congestion
Overview
Agents Adverse effects Recommended alternative drugs
Antibiotics
Tetracycline
Aminoglycosides (e.g., streptomycin)
Trimethoprim/sulfonamide
Chloramphenicol
Clarithromycin
Fluoroquinolones
Metronidazole
Antihypertensives
Diuretics
Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors
Angiotensin-receptor blockers
Atenolol
Antifungals

Azoles (e.g., ketoconazole, high-dose itraconazole and fluconazole)

Antimetabolites (e.g., flucytosine)
Benzofurans (e.g., griseofulvin)
Antivirals
Efavirenz
Ribavirin

Interferon α

Ribavirin PLUS interferon α
Didanosine PLUS stavudine
Nevirapine
Anticoagulants
Warfarin
Phenprocoumon
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (e.g., apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran)
Analgesics
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
Metamizole
Thionamides (e.g., methimazole, carbimazole, thiamazole)
Radioiodine therapy
Antiepileptics
Valproate
Carbamazepine
Phenytoin
Antiemetics
Domperidone
Cannabinoids
Miscellaneous drugs
Steroids

Oral antidiabetic agents

Methotrexate
Cholestyramine
Lithium
Antineoplastic drugs
Isotretinoin and vitamin A
Misoprostol

5α-reductase inhibitors

Antacids (calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide)
Trimethadione
  • Fetal trimethadione syndrome

  • N/A
Diethylstilbestrol
Thalidomide
Recreational substances
Alcohol
  • N/A
Amphetamines
Cigarettes (nicotine, carbon monoxide)
Cocaine
Opioids (e.g., heroin)
Physical agents
Radiation
  • N/A
Metal poisoning
Lead
  • N/A
Mercury
  1. Oxacillin Injection.
  2. ZOSYN (piperacillin and tazobactam) for injection.
  3. COSENTYX® (secukinumab) injection, for subcutaneous use.
  4. SYNAGIS® (palivizumab) injection, for intramuscular use.
  5. PROCARDIA XL® (nifedipine) Extended Release Tablets For Oral Use.
  6. Apresoline hydrochloride hydralazine hydrochloride USP Tablets.
  7. Sodium Nitroprusside Injection Fliptop Vial.
  8. Minipress® Capsules (prazosin hydrochloride) For Oral Use.
  9. CARDURA® (doxazosin mesylate) tablets, for oral use.
  10. Catapres® (clonidine hydrochloride, USP).
  11. MYXREDLIN (insulin human in sodium chloride injection), for intravenous use.
  12. WELLBUTRIN XL (bupropion hydrochloride extended-release) tablets for oral use.
  13. NEXTERONE (amiodarone HCl) Injection for intravenous use.
  14. MAGNESIUM SULFATE IN DEXTROSE injection, for intravenous use.
  15. METHIMAZOLE TABLETS, USP.
  16. Motrin®, Ibuprofen Tablets, USP.
  17. DURLAZA® (aspirin) Extended Release Capsules, for oral use.
  18. CELEBREX® (celecoxib) capsules, for oral use.
  19. LAMICTAL® (lamotrigine) Tablets.
  20. GABITRIL® (tiagabine hydrochloride) Tablets.
  21. KEPPRA (levetiracetam) tablets, for oral use.
  22. SABRIL (vigabatrin) tablets, for oral use.
  23. TOPAMAX (topiramate) TABLETS, for oral use.
  24. ReoPro (Abciximab) For intravenous administration.
  25. PLAVIX (clopidogrel bisulfate) tablets.
  26. ELIQUIS (apixaban) tablets for oral use.
  27. HEPARIN SODIUM, for intravenous use.
  28. ARIXTRA (fondaparinux sodium injection) solution for subcutaneous injection.
  29. ORGARAN (danaparoid sodium) Injection.
  30. ARGATROBAN INJECTION in 0.9% Sodium Chloride, for intravenous infusion only.
  31. ACTIVASE (alteplase) for injection, for intravenous use.
  32. TRACLEER® (bosentan) tablets, for oral use.
  33. FLOLAN (epoprostenol sodium) for injection, for intravenous use.
  34. PROAIR HFA (albuterol sulfate) INHALATION AEROSOL.
  35. PERFOROMIST® (formoterol fumarate) Inhalation Solution.
  36. SINGULAIR® (montelukast sodium) Tablets, Chewable Tablets, and Oral Granules.
  37. ZYFLO® (zileuton tablets).
  38. Intal® Nebulizer Solution (cromolyn sodium inhalation solution, USP).
  39. XOLAIR® (omalizumab) for injection, for subcutaneous use.
  40. NUCALA (mepolizumab) for injection, for subcutaneous use.
  41. Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride Injection, USP.
  42. CLARITIN® brand of loratadine TABLETS, SYRUP, and RAPIDLY-DISINTEGRATING TABLETS.
  43. DIAMOX® SEQUELS® (Acetazolamide Extended-Release Capsules).
  44. Furosemide Injection, USP.
  45. Ethacrynic Acid Tablets USP.
  46. Aldactone® spironolactone tablets, USP.